Total Eclipse of the Garden

blackout bed covers

I couldn’t resist the title. There is a full moon lunar eclipse in Scorpio tonight.

Let’s see what’s going on in the garden. 

A proper understanding of how big my house and garden are hit me about two weeks ago.

When we moved in, we were both employed, and we hired someone to trim and repair things as we needed. We did a little remodeling and painting but little if any preventive maintenance.

Now that I’m here all day long with little extra cash for hiring help,  I’ve taken a close look, and there’s A LOT of work to be done. I was overwhelmed for about a week. The result was not work, but reading.

I read my journals from Mexico. I remembered I know how to garden, which was reassuring. And that I can fix all kinds of things with just sticks mud, sweat and perseverance. I was reminded that a good deal of what I accomplished while living in Mexico, I did alone. I give him most of the credit, Felipe is a rock star, but he was often working; he had his fires to put out or was too exhausted to care about every need of our homestead. I could not have done without him, but I did become quite self-reliant.

If you don’t journal, I recommend it.  To have a written history available to you, biased or not, is invaluable. Buoyed by my records, I got back to work.

The first thing I did was clean and organize the bodega. I found essential tools I thought I was going to have to buy. The machetes need sharpening, I’ll give it a shot with my stone, but I think they need a pro.  I hope to find an afilador with a bicycle attached to his wheel!  I promise a picture if I do.

Gardening tools Nicaragua

Tools unearthed in the bodega!

Then I rounded up all the bricks, roof, and floor tiles I could find and carried on with covering the beds in plastic to kill weeds before I plant on the new moon. plasic covering to kill weeds

More overwhelm set in when I realized how many weights and bags it would take and that I still had to cut all the posts and PVC for the row covers. I’m doing this with my jeweler saw.  Yes, you can cut rebar with a jeweler’s saw, but I hope the hacksaw I found in the bodega will be a better option. I’m going through a lot of blades.

Yesterday, I took the day off and trekked out for supplies, including a stop at our local thrift shop. Finding this excellent gardening hat and long socks for my boots helped get me back to the beds today. They make me look like Gilly, but,  this is a killer hat, and no boot rash is a big plus.

More improvements! Most of what I’ll put in will be direct seeded, but I have these fancy new seed pots made of tofu containers. They’re a significant upgrade from the pizza boxes.

seedlings

Tomatoes in the tofu boxes, and volunteer chilis and papayas.

Something I’ve learned about housing and gardening is:  there will be trial and error.

A few examples:

Our roof needed repairs, and it was cheaper to put a new roof on top of the old one. They’re both made of corrugated roofing sheets.  The original is fiberglass, and the top layer, the one we installed, is corrugated tin. Felipe thought it would be too hot for an animal to nest between the two.

Guess what bats hate: wind. Guess what bats love: heat. Our roof is a bat condo. I got a sonar bat repellant, and it works-mostly. I also installed a bat house. It’s unoccupied. Why live in a box when you have a condo?

The previous owner left us many fabulous trees. But now they’re so huge they’re blocking out the sun of the citrus trees.  I’m left with a sad dilemma of what wonderful trees to cut down. I’ll start with some serious pruning. Hopefully, it will be enough.

Mother addressed the issue of my surami cherries gone wild. She’s ruthless!

 

The small kitchen garden is now in full shade, and little is prospering. It is a winter garden. The tomatoes, which will not grow without enough sun, are too big to transfer.  I’m hoping the herbs will not need to be moved…vamos a ver.

My final garden fancy for the week.

Years ago, I got it in my head that Central America should have Papasan chairs. I wanted to grow bamboo in Mexico and start a cottage industry. Felipe wasn’t hot on it, probably because he was working a grueling full-time job, growing his own crops, and raising pigs. But, I still think it’s a grand idea, and 3 years ago I bought these black bamboo plants.

Black Bamboo, Nicaragua

The crowning glory of my garden.

This plant was about two feet when I bought it, and is now over 20 feet tall. And it has over 20 corms.  It looms in my sunset view and makes me happy every time I see it. I have four others. When the dry season returns I will cut enough to dry and learn to bend bamboo.

There are many bamboo benders in Catrina, but I’ll probably learn how to do it from youtube videos. It’s how I learned how to butcher.

The full moon is a time of illumination, but what is it when it’s dimmed or blocked from sight? Darkness when we expect light is an opportune time to look within.

Today is a perfect day to get your hands and feet on the ground. Dig in your garden, pull your potted plants out for a sunbath, and walk the dog barefoot in the grass.

Do your work, wait for the light, and plan your papasan.

Abrazos,

A

Present Pictures

I struggle with images. I see things I want to keep and share, but I feel when I capture a moment, or I’m thinking about taking photos I’m no longer as present as I want to be.

Moss Brick

Moss Brick, I love moss, this feels like the kind of present I want to be.

Today I walked to the store. I didn’t take my phone, no soundtrack, no texts, just me walking, being in town. I saw so many amazing things!

Bueys on playa Popoyo Nicargaua

Different Bueys, Another day.

I was bummed I didn’t have my camera.

This is what I saw:

five young boys on a buey cart bickering over who got to drive, a red aproned woman sweeping her dirt stoop of bright yellow flowers that fell in the night, men selling flower plants, carrying them in big sombreros on their heads. Imagine this full of flowers 🙂 Vintage Authentic Mexican Sombrero Bread Basket | Basket, Bread basket, Wicker laundry basket

Roses bought from a street vendor.

I bought these lovely roses from them. They actually smell like roses!

It was so beautiful!  I’m sorry I can’t show you.  The flower guys would definitely have been up for a photoshoot.

Some of the magic was the ambiance.  We had a slow, lush rain last night.  It was early, people were just starting to stir.

It’s the first week of rain, right before we go full-blown tropical. It was still, and fecund, like a secret on the cusp of revelation.

From my balcony after the rain.

Here are a few more moments I saved this week.

A portrait of Nicaragua’s national bird. The Guardavaranca.

Mot Mot

There are many guardas on the path! I see at least 2  every time I walk.

I also see monkeys on my daily walk! This is a howler, they’re aptly named.

Howler Monkey, NIcargua

Mono in the morning.

I try to get to the beach once a week, it’s a 15-minute walk. I lived here for 3 years and hardly ever went to the beach. There was always something that needed to be done, or I was lazy. A couple of months ago I realized living near the ocean without making it a regular part of your routine argues a life not well-lived.

Sunset with my friend

Me and my friend Isabel at the beach for sunset this friday, our weekly ritual.

There was a huge swell!  No surfers, which is unusual. Isabel had to reassure me we would not be swept out to sea. As cancer, you’d think I’d be more ocean-friendly.

boats sunset Nicaragau

Sunsets in Nicaragua deliver. Playa Jiquiliste, Nicaragua

Coming soon, garden updates!

Paz,

A

What’s your take on taking pictures? I’d love to know how you manage your media and stay in the moment.

Circles and Vessels

Full moon morning. 6am, Las Lajas NIcaragua

Sometimes things show up the opposite of where we think they should.

Wind Writing

And we have to look closely to understand how they got there. 

Mushroom Bowls

There is tenderness everywhere. How gently the fungus cradle the leaves.

Burrowing spiders make fences of flowers.

I am observing circles and the stories they tell.

Banana Bowl

Banana Bowl

How the elements hold each other.

Random guy with sunset

Both random and profound.

 

This month I have been writing a book. And my internet provider awaits new equipment lulling in customs, so my internet is glitchy. The above is a picture story of my days as I prepare to publish a book for the first time!

It will be available here soon 😉

Home Butchery

I love to butcher. I know for many it’s weird, maybe even macabre. This is why I like it.

Butcher Abby

Abby and a pig head.

1. It’s authentic. I’m an omnivore. I have killed and butchered my own animals I bottle-fed and loved because I am a farmer and it was their purpose. When I eat meat I wholly know I am being sustained by an individual creature’s life. Because of this understanding, I deeply honor my meat and the animals who gave it. I try to only eat animals I know what their lives were like, ideally I will butcher them myself.

2. It’s interesting, I enjoy the anatomy, and how bodies come together. Seam butchery, cleaning silver skin, and slicing the skin from pork belly is meditative.

3. When I am able to butcher my own meat there is no waste. Nothing about the animal’s death was in vain.

4. I get the cuts I want the way I want them.

5. I know it’s fresh.

Last week I butchered a pig head. With the package comes the feet and organs, for 15$.

Here’s what I did with it.

pork jowls

Cheek Bacon.

First I removed the jowls and made a quick guanciale style bacon:

I crushed peppercorns, coriander, allspice, and garlic into a paste in my mortar and pestle. I rubbed that on the cheeks and then slathered them in kosher salt.

Then I weighted(one chafing on top of another with a weight on top) them for two days in the refrigerator, turning them once.

roasted jowls with carrtos and radishes

Quick Jowl bacon with roasted vegetables

Jowl Bacon with Roasted Vetables

Cheek bacon, with roasted veggies. Soooo good. Yes, I ate all the fat.

I rinsed and dried the jowl, and rubbed some wild honey on it before roasting it with organic carrots and radishes, a 270 degrees for 2 1/2 hours.

I also cut this lovely neck roast for a braise.

pork neck roast

pork neck roast

I did not make pozole. I know it’s sacrilege. But, there’s no pozole corn here, and it make so much…I’d have to have a party. Maybe next time.

I boiled the rest of the head and removed the tastier bits for various future recipes. I also have 20 quarts for collagen-rich stock, and many nice hunks of less human palatable flesh to enhance my dog’s diet.

Estos para mi equipo, los extraño chico/as xoxoxo

Probecho!